Greta Thunberg has become world-renowned because of her fight against climate change and lower temperatures on Earth. It all started in 2018 when she began a school strike on her own, standing outside the Swedish parliament with different placards trying to shape opinion and get young people to join.

The Swedish mainstream media quickly picked up her one-girl-mission against climate change and wrote several articles about her.

Few citizens of Sweden could back then even dream of what the future would hold – soon enough Thunberg met the Pope (pictured), spoke in front of the United Nations, and has even been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize.

The once lonely 15-year old girl has become world-famous, more or less overnight, when international mainstream media started reporting about her 15-day-long school strike. Arnold Schwarzenegger even invited her to a climate meeting in Vienna.

So who is this young idealist? Greta Thunberg is now 16-years old and the daughter of the famous opera singer and left-liberal activist Marlena Ernman (pictured above), who in the background has helped her daughter get started.

Thunberg soon also got her own coach – a well-known climate activist from Germany by the name Luisa-Marie Neubauer (pictured). What is the likelihood of a young girl who starts a school strike outside the Swedish parliament, getting schoolchildren from all over the world to join her cause and fight against climate change? And how often do 16-year-olds have their own coaches?

Luisa-Marie Neubauer, who has been captured on numerous images and videos together with Greta when the two direct climate change protests all over the world, belongs to the organization called ONE” foundation.

It has several well-known wealthy financiers, including Bono as well as Bill and Melissa Gates. An even more striking name is that of the multi-billionaire oligarch George Soros, notorious for his currency speculation and maybe even more prominent as the father of the global, radical, and left-liberal lobby and activist network “Open Society”, supporting thousands of NGOs.